Monthly Archives February 2015

How do we foster collective Intelligence?

It took me years to understand that human intelligence must be seen both as an individual and a collective phenomenon – although this insight is not new.  Dialogic settings  – the only way to harness collective intelligence – are essentially human and have a long tradition in human history. Dialogue is a communicative structure, and as such can become a container for the awareness of mutuality and interdependence. In a circle hierarchy is not structurally exposed, nor are lines of communication influenced by the seating order. But the essence is that each person sees herself as important as he or she sees the
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Bringing the creative urge back into our life

We all wish to be creative, and in fact – we all are. But creativity has its own rhythms and dynamics. Bringing the creative urge back into our life is not always easy. Because it requires phases of non-action – not something we have many opportunities to do in the daily rush of events. It may help to unearth what our pattern of creativity is. One thing is sure – when we are creative, our heart is involved, we feel closer to life, and no matter how aware of it we are, we feel closer to our deepest values. People
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10 Ingredients for successful collective action

When we want to bring forth sustainability, we need to engage people. Be it in the area of sustainable production and consumption, environmental management, resource protection, responsible supply chain management, energy efficiency, climate adaptation, social cohesion, demographic change or sustainable business. My experience is that people engage when they resonate with the content and goal of an endeavor, an initiative, or a change process. The questions: what can we do to make this happen?
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Stakeholder engagement – a practical guide

Where collaboration initiatives for sustainability have been successful they built a step-by-step engagement of actors, as representatives of institutions and as people who opened up to making a difference. Plans were important, rigidity not. The role of a caretaker  is crucial – a person or core group who takes the change process further,  attends to engagement regularly and keeps the communication flowing. Combining flexibility and openness to adjustments with commitment and reliability is the key to success. Common Code for the Coffee Community Initiative No engagement can be maintained without a larger and emotionally charged vision for change that all actors
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